While the recreational use of marijuana was recently approved in Colorado, this does not give users carte blanche to get behind the wheel of a vehicle while stoned. Driving after having ingested drugs or medication is as illegal as driving while under the influence of alcohol. Even persons who use marijuana for medical reasons legally can be arrested for DUI.

How the new law plays out in terms of the amount of marijuana that can be used legally before getting behind the wheel is up in the air. While everyone is aware that blood alcohol content can be effective in keeping impaired drivers who have used alcohol off the road, there is no such widely accepted test for limiting the amount of pot that should be allowed in the bloodstream. The new law did not put a cap on the amount of THC that is acceptable.

Determining when a driver has had too much pot depends on a number of factors and there is no agreement on what standard should be used. For example infrequent users of pot may become stoned much earlier than someone who has built up a tolerance. The state is working on a regulatory framework for implementation of the new law. The other issue is that a residue of marijuana remains in the bloodstream long after the effects of smoking have worn off, making current tests unusable to determine the level of intoxication.

Using marijuana and then driving is hazardous. THC affects balance, memory, judgment, and more, and impacts on the reaction time of a driver. Anyone who is injured in an accident that involves a drugged driver should reach out to an experienced Denver auto accident attorney for help receiving fair compensation.